Ready or Not, Mobile Health IT is Here to Stay

Posted by PureWeb on Thu, Jul 30, 2015

Using smartphones and tablets for clinical patient care is rapidly becoming the new normal for providers. Until recently, most were using their devices for research or communicating with colleagues, in other words non-clinical applications. In just one year, the percentage of physicians using mobile devices to manage patient care -- ordering prescriptions, accessing records, ordering tests or viewing results -- has grown from 8 to 31 percent.[1] That's an almost three fold increase between 2013 and 2014. Among those most likely group of smartphone users are ER doctors, obstetrician-gynecologists, general and orthopedic surgeons and radiologists. Today, mobile tech is rapidly transitioning to a tool for clinical care delivery.

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Supporting Modern Healthcare Delivery with Secure Mobile Health IT

Posted by PureWeb on Fri, Jul 24, 2015

At healthcare institutions across the country security breaches have become an epidemic of their own. Most recently, a break-in at the UCLA Health System may have compromised the addresses, Social Security numbers, medical records and ID numbers of as many as 4.5 million people. [1] In this environment, health IT and security administrators are increasingly reluctant to open their networks to mobile access. "Security is the biggest barrier to using mobile health IT," confirms Randy Tebbs, Information Systems Analyst at Intermountain Healthcare in Salt Lake City, UT.

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Cardiac CT Emerging as Mainstream Diagnostic and Screening Tool

Posted by Randy Rountree on Thu, Jul 16, 2015

First Online Training Demoed at Las Vegas Gathering of Over 1000 Cardiac Image Experts

Imaging is rapidly becoming a standard element in the screening and diagnosis of heart patients. Anyone heading to the ER with chest pains today may find themselves being sent for non-invasive imaging for diagnostic purposes instead of to a "cath lab." With the development of faster, 3D imaging doctors now have a wealth of information from patient scans, eliminating the need in many cases for more invasive techniques to rule out heart disease. Of course the decision on whether to send a patient for cardiovascular computer tomography (cardiac CT) or to the cath lab depends on their risk profile, but for many patients cardiac CT offers faster, less expensive diagnosis that gets them out of the ER in less time.

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